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coefficient of friction on dirt roads



I searched the TRIS database and found the following 4 resources, one of which is the 1934 report mentioned.

 

Here’s the website for the TRIS database, which is free to search: http://tris.trb.org/

 

Hope this helps.

 

Laura

 

Laura Whayne, Librarian

Technology Transfer Program

Kentucky Transportation Center

University of Kentucky

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Email: lwhayne@xxxxxxxxxxxx

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From: Database Admin [mailto:bpost@xxxxxxx]
Sent: Monday, May 17, 2010 1:40 PM
To: Laura Whayne
Subject: TRISworld Marked Records

 

Title:

The Possibility of Implementing the Management Cycle of Winter Maintenance by Performance Measurement

Accession Number:

01103930

Record Type:

Component

Language:

English

Record URL:

http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/circulars/ec126.pdf

Abstract:

The studded-tire regulation prevented studded tire dust from being released into the environment; consequently, this leads to air quality improvement. On the other hand, the most important factor that determines vehicular movement on icy roadways is the frictional force between winter tire and road surface, and it greatly affects travel performance and safety on snowy and icy roadways. Putting conclusive restrictions on winter travel, the regulation leads to some negative effects, such as increased winter accidents, worsened winter travel, increased anti-icing chemical usage, and increased winter maintenance cost. When one evaluates the studded-tire regulation regarded as one policy, the regulation guides the negative effects of winter travel and winter road maintenance while achieving its intended goal, which controls dust pollution caused by studded tires. At the time of the legislative vote on the regulation, the supplementary decision indicated the need for a review of the state of the measures after the regulation was implemented. Moreover, with enforcement of the Policy Evaluation Act, road authorities have performed their road management by setting up targets in number. This study proposes the management of winter road maintenance with the logic model that recognizes travel pattern, traffic accidents, and compliant numbers as the final outcome of the policy while establishing the friction coefficient of winter road surfaces, which is the direct effect of winter road maintenance, as the policy’s intermediate outcome. The study also attempts to use this model to see how it works.

TRIS Files:

TRIS

Report Numbers:

Snow08-007

Media Type:

Web

Pagination:

pp 499-511

Authors:

Asano, Motoki

Phone: +81-11-841-1116
Fax: +81-11-841-9747
m-asano@xxxxxxxxxx
Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold Region

Tokunaga, Roberto Abraham

Phone: +81-11-841-1738
Fax: +81-11-841-9747
roberto-1097ga@xxxxxxxxxx
Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold Region

Features:

Figures; Photos; References (7)

Monograph Title:

Surface Transportation Weather and Snow Removal and Ice Control Technology: Fourth National Conference on Surface Transportation Weather and Seventh International Symposium on Snow Removal and Ice Control Technology, June 16-19, 2008, Indianapolis, Indiana

Monograph Accession Number:

01103914

Availability:

Find a library where document is available

Publication Date:

20080600

Conference:

Fourth National Conference on Surface Transportation Weather; Seventh International Symposium on Snow Removal and Ice Control Technology
Location: Indianapolis Indiana, United States
Date: 20080616 - 20080619
Sponsors: Transportation Research Board; Indiana Department of Transportation; American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials; Federal Highway Administration

Serial:

Transportation Research E-Circular
Issue Number: E-C126
Publisher: Transportation Research Board
ISSN: 0097-8515

Index Terms:

Air quality; Coefficient of friction; Dust control; Friction; Friction coefficient; Frictional coefficient; Icy roads; Japan; Maintenance management; Performance measurement; Regulations; Rolling contact; Studded tires; Tire pavement interface; Wheel rail interaction; Winter maintenance

Subject Areas:

Highways; Law; Maintenance and Preservation; I62: Winter Maintenance

 

 

 

Title:

Initial Findings on Skid Resistance of Unpaved Roads

Accession Number:

01046066

Record Type:

Component

Language:

English

Record URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.3141/2016-06

Abstract:

Unpaved roads have a dynamic surface, which can make it difficult to predict the skid resistance of a section for use in geometric design and gravel selection and to schedule maintenance. This investigation showed that there are three mechanisms for skidding on unpaved roads: intersurface friction, sliding on a thin layer of loose material, and plowing through a thick layer of loose material. The main surface and material properties affecting skid resistance are the stoniness severity and extent, the severity and extent of raveling, and the amount of loose material in the 0.850-mm to 2.00-mm range on the surface. The range of coefficients of friction for unpaved roads is from 0.40 to 0.85, with the lower value being conservative.

TRIS Files:

TRIS

Media Type:

Print

Pagination:

pp 49-55

Authors:

Lea, Jeremy David

Phone: 530-752-1752
jdlea@xxxxxxxxxxx
University of California, Davis

Jones, David J

Council for Scientific and Industrial Research

Features:

Figures (3) ; References (10) ; Tables (2)

Monograph Title:

Geology and Properties of Earth Materials 2007

Monograph Accession Number:

01084477

Availability:

Transportation Research Board Business Office

500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001 USA

Find a library where document is available

ISBN:

9780309104432

Publication Date:

20070000

Serial:

Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Issue Number: 2016
Publisher: Transportation Research Board
ISSN: 0361-1981

Index Terms:

Coefficient of friction; Fretting (Pavements); Friction coefficient; Frictional coefficient; Gravel; Gravel roads; Raveling (Pavements); Skid resistance; Stripping (Pavements); Unpaved roads

Subject Areas:

Design; Highways; Pavements; I22: Design of Pavements, Railways and Guideways; I23: Properties of Road Surfaces

 

 

 

Title:

SURFACE DRESSING OF GRAVEL ROADS. TRAFFIC AND FRICTION SURVEYS

Original Title:

YTBEHANDLING AV GRUSVAGAR. TRAFIK-OCH FRIKTIONSSTUDIER

Accession Number:

00168406

Record Type:

Monograph

Abstract:

In the spring of 1976, the Swedish Road Administration, for test purposes, arranged for the surface dressing of about 100 km of gravel roads with a new, inexpensive coating called Y1G. No improvements was made in the cross-section, alignment of sight distances of the roads. The present report accounts for the results of traffic surveys and friction measurements undertaken before, and after, the surfaces dressing was made. The measurements were carried out in order to provide a basis for the evaluation of how the surface dressing affected the traffic safety. The investigation demonstrated that the surface dressing resulted in: An increase of the coefficient of friction of the road surface by 0,1-0,3; An increase of the median speed by 1,5-3,5 km/h, and a slightly lesser increase in the speeds lying above the median speed; An stimated reduction of the stopping distances by 0.15%; Reduced or unchanged utilization of friction in horizontal courves; No clear change of the estimated possibilities of evasive actions in connection with meeting other vehicles on hilltops with blocked sight distances. The results refer to passenger cars and dry summer roadway conditions. The conclusion which may be drawn from that study is that the surface dressing should not have impaired traffic safety. The results rather indicate a certain degree of improvement. The results also point to the importance of utilizing the whole width of the gravel road as extensively as possible for the surface dressing. /Author/

TRIS Files:

TRIS

Report Numbers:

Report No. 119

Pagination:

73 p.

Authors:

CARLSSON, G

Oberg, G

Features:

Appendices (9) ; Figures (14) ; References (16) ; Tables (15)

Corporate Authors:

Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, VTI

Olaus Magnus väg 35
Linköping SE-581 95 Sweden

Publication Date:

19770000

Index Terms:

Alignment; Alinement; Automotive vehicles; Before and after studies; Coatings; Coefficient of friction; Costs; Cross sections; Curves (Geometry); Friction coefficient; Frictional coefficient; Gravel roads; Horizontal curves; Motor vehicles; Seal coats; Sight distance; Speed; Stopping distances; Stopping time; Surface dressing; Surface finish; Traffic safety; Traffic speed; Waterproofing course

Subject Areas:

Finance; Highways; Pavements

 

 

 

Title:

SKIDDING CHARACTERISTICS OF ROAD SURFACES

Accession Number:

00207156

Record Type:

Component

Abstract:

THE COEFFICIENTS OF FRICTION OF RUBBER TIRES ON VARIOUS ROAD SURFACES BOTH WET AND DRY WERE MEASURED FOR BOTH STRAIGHT AHEAD AND SIDEWAYS SKIDDING AT SPEEDS OF FROM THREE TO FORTY MILES PER HOUR. AN INGENIOUS SPECIAL INTEGRATING DYNAMOMETER WAS DESIGNED FOR MEASURING THE SKIDDING FORCES. TESTS WERE RUN UPON 25 DIFFERENT TYPES OF SURFACES, INCLUDING ASPHALT, TAR, ROAD OIL, PORTLAND CEMENT, BRICK, GRAVEL, CINDERS, ASPHALT PLANK, STEEL PLATES, WOOD PLANK, AND MUD ON CONCRETE. IN GENERAL A MARKED DECREASE IN COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION WAS NOTED WITH INCREASE IN SPEED, ALTHOUGH THE REVERSE WAS TRUE IN THE CASE OF THE GRAVEL AND CINDER SURFACES. IT WAS FOUND THAT THE COEFFICIENTS AT THREE TO FIVE MILE SPEEDS ARE NOT INDICATIVE OF THE VALUES AT THE HIGHER RATES OF SPEED. TYPICAL OF THE DATA OBSERVED IN THESE TESTS ARE THE FOLLOWING COEFFICIENTS OF FRICTION ON VARIOUS WET PAVEMENT SURFACES FOR SKIDDING STRAIGHT AHEAD AT THIRTY MILES PER HOUR: SANDSTONE ROCK ASPHALT 0.59 TO 0.77; SHEET ASPHALT 0.47 TO 0.63; BITULITHIC 0.50 TO 0.63; ASPHALTIC CONCRETE 0.65 TO 0.60; ASPHALTIC RETREAD 0.40 TO 0.51; ROAD OIL MIX 0.35 TO 0.50; PENETRATION MACADAM 0.20 TO 0.28; REPRESSED BRICK WITH GROUT FILLER 0.35 TO 0.48; VERTICAL FIBER BRICK WITH ASPHALT FILLER 0.38 TO 0.52; PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE, ROUGH FINISH 0.37 TO 0.48; PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE, SMOOTH FINISH 0.40 TO 0.46; MEDIUM HARD TAR MACADAM 0.66 TO 0.47; OILED GRAVEL 0.45 TO 0.46; UNTREATED GRAVEL 0.68 TO 0.71. (THE FIRST FIGURE IN EACH CASE IS FOR SMOOTH TREAD TIRES, THE SECOND FOR NON-SKID TREADS.) A DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTIC OF THE BITUMINOUS PAVEMENTS THAT SHOWED THE GREATEST RESISTANCE TO SKIDDING WAS THE "SAND PAPER" TEXTURE OF THE SURFACE. FROM A THEORETICAL ANALYSIS IT IS DEDUCED THAT TO BE REASONABLY FREE FROM THE DANGER OF SKIDDING A ROAD SURFACE WHEN WET SHOULD HAVE A STRAIGHT SKID COEFFICIENT OF 0.4 OR HIGHER AT FORTY MILES PER HOUR AND A STATIC OR SIDE SKID COEFFICIENT OF 0.5 OR HIGHER AT THIRTY MILES PER HOUR. ALTHOUGH AN ATTEMPT WAS MADE TO SELECT REPRESENTATIVE SURFACES IN TYPICAL CONDITION, THE RESULTS REPORTED APPLY ONLY TO THE ONES TESTED AND IT SHOULD NOT BE ASSUMED THAT THE RESULTS OF TESTS ON A PARTICULAR SURFACE ARE TYPICAL OF ALL SURFACES IN THAT CLASS. MANY TESTS ARE ALSO REPORTED SHOWING THE EFFECTS OF TIRE PRESSURE, WHEEL LOADS, TYPE OF TIRE TREAD AND TEMPERATURE. /AUTHOR/

Supplemental Notes:

Vol 13, ParT I, PP 123 - 168, 29 FIG, 1 TAB

TRIS Files:

TRIS

Authors:

MOYER, R A

Availability:

Transportation Research Board Business Office

500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001 USA

Publication Date:

19340000

Serial:

Highway Research Board Proceedings
Publisher: Highway Research Board

Index Terms:

Asphalt pavements; Blanket course; Blast Furnace Slag; Brick pavements; Cinders; Coefficient of friction; Cutback asphalt; Dynamometers; Friction coefficient; Frictional coefficient; Gravel roads; Liquid asphalt; Mineral tar; Moisture content; Mud; Portland cement; Road surfaces; Rubber tires; Skid resistance; Skid resistance tests; Slag; Speed; Steel plates; Surface course (Pavements); Surface properties; Surface texture; Tar; Temperature; Texture; Tire treads; Tires; Treads; Types; Tyres; Water content; Wet conditions; Wood

Subject Areas:

Highways; Pavements; Vehicles and Equipment